This Is Twittering: Meta-Commentary Digest, Episode 35

Oh, no. Not this again. (Now with embedded toots!)

WORDPLAY:

I have bizarre fixations on certain phrases. Most are overused clichés that have had their meanings diluted: “good news/bad news,” “rock and roll,” “I love you, but I’m not in love with you.”

WORDPLAY:

Spangler.

STUPID:

I send my severed words to prostitutes.

WISDOM:

I’m also bizarrely fixated on the word affectation/affect. It seems to be a word specially created by poets, preloaded with double meanings and fun phonemes. BEHOLD! OUR AMAZING ENGLISH LANGUAGE!

WORDPLAY:

Likewise: nothing but sex.1

REACTION:

I’ve noticed that a lot of people tend to blame their city when bad things happen. Cars getting stolen, vandalism, violent crimes we hear about on the news. My favorite is when people say, “Only in Fresno!” or “Only in America!” or “Only in wherever!”2 It’s an understandable feeling. The argument could even be made, based on crime statistics or whatever, that certain cities are more prone to certain types of events. But it’s mostly ridiculous. Anyone who’s ever lived in more than one place knows (or should know) that these types of things happen everywhere. But it’s a byproduct of the way our brains work: we unconsciously assume that if we aren’t aware of something, it must not exist.

The local news is, by necessity, designed to confirm these feelings. We trust the news to inform us of stuff we ought to be informed about, but it is filtered through a local lens that ignores (by necessity) non-local stories. BEHOLD! OUR AMAZING ENGLISH BRAINS!

Speaking of crime, let’s talk about murder.

WISDOM:

Here I am, doing my cliché reductio ad absurdum bit.

WORDPLAY:

This is a play on the “a stranger is a friend you haven’t met” sappy saying, but mainly I like the idea of words being physical things you can interact with. Or, in this case, murder people with.

WISDOM:

If you’re of a certain emotional persuasion, this may seem more profound than it is. Really, it’s just me playing with the phrase “stab in the back”.

REACTION:

I’m always on the lookout for new ways to let people know I have no self-respect.

That concludes this episode of this thing.

  1. I make jokes with and about words. Sometimes those words take me to interesting places. []
  2. This is another phrase I’m fixated on. []